Rainplace

The Rainplace Blog has a great series of posts on squash and stretch, its in 3 parts (Part1, Part2, Part3). Frank found this one and brought it to my attention, thanks Frank. Adding to the Basic Physics section.

7 comments:

michelle said...

I can't stop watching the kids playing soccer! As for the boy jumping on the horses back... I know Mike Nguyen says somewhere else on his blog that he doesn't consider himself a great drawer but as he says; he creates movement and follows through with his intent in that beautiful movement. Individual drawings don't matter as much as the movement.I find his blog inspiring and it will certainly be worth the wait for "My Little World".

michelle said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
michelle said...

Sorry that was me trying to leave a link to what I quoted. But if you go back to Rainplace and search for "Rolling", you come to a post from 11th August 2008 named just that: (Rolling) with a video of his rolling technique, something that Frank was getting us to do Friday, as an animation warmup at the start of the class.
Frank: "Great to see that paper wrinkling!"

Frank said...

Hey Thanks for the comments Michelle. Now I look at the excellent-to-see ruff animation again on Rainplace, I can see that it is quite similar to your style, so I'm glad it made you explore more.

I will look up the rolling link. Yes it was fun encouraging the first years to 'flip out'. I just felt that flipping paper is one of those tangible animation skills unique to the craft and evryone should share in its joy. I find it more fun than ckicking arrow keys on a keyboard.

Frank said...

If you dig further into Mike Nguyen's 'rainplace' blog you can find some of the roug 'tie down' animation he did for Iron Giant.

Frank said...

Here is the "rolling" link:
Rolling, rolling, rolling...

Yes, I'll admit it, I have done a multimedia qualification and nerded it up with HTML and other types of coding. Please don't tell my students. I only remember enough to make links in blogs.

Frank said...

"One objective of rough animation is to allow the pencil to explore, making certain that the animated mass is breathing according to its given properties.

Another is to search for right spacing to accommodate the force of movement in conversation.

As the pencil goes searching, it leaves a trail of swirling lines round about the animated mass. Because of these extra lines, the surface texture of rough pencil test appears more vibrant and fills with energy, but can be misleading."


I love the way Mike writes.

You know what just click the ANIMATION link on his blog and digest every one of his posts. :)